Master List

All Night Long

The wonderful Chilton Price wrote this spicy song. Though no more than R rated, the song makes its meaning clear. Ms. Price’s biggest hit was “You Belong to Me.” She composed this song alone, though a couple of the band members who introduced the piece wangled their way into a share of the compensation. This practice has not been at all rare. Hey, do you think Elvis really wrote “Love Me Tender”?

Can’t Buy Me Love

This classic from the Fab Four is not only lively and wise, it is contestable too (though SAI groups should check with a Music judge). But whether for contest or show, this song is a sure winner. “Everybody tells me so!” Tim Waurick’s tracks for women are purely great, and he now has them for men too.  Continue reading Can’t Buy Me Love

Dancing Frankie Medley

The Frankenstein monster can surely raise cane—well, when he is Able—but you should see him dance. If you have seen the film “Young Frankenstein,” you will be able to figure out what the main song in this monster medley is. This piece of lunacy goes well with the “Fabricating Frankie Medley.” No longer exclusive to the Big Apple Chorus.

For Good (two soloists)

From the musical Wicked, this song features a heartfelt, intense dialogue between witches Elphaba and Glinda. If your group has two good soloists with medium to high voices, this is the ticket for you. This arrangement, and the sentiments of the song, work just fine for men as well. Tracks for the women’s version have been recorded by Shawn Thomas.  Continue reading For Good (two soloists)

Hit the Road, Jack

This emphatic tune is arranged for four-part women’s voices with male solo. The fellow needs to be either a bass or a low baritone—low in more than one sense of the word? The arrangement is also available in German. That title translates as “Come, Drink Up, Jack.” Fun, eh?

I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire

When well-known barbershopper Darryl Flinn first heard my current quartet, Lock 4, he remarked on what a fine voice our lead, Keith, had and declared him to be the lost Ink Spot. So naturally I went back and arranged Keith’s favorite Ink Spot song. The piece lives more vividly with guitar accompaniment, and there is even a traditional, uh, spot for a bass recitation.
By the way, our quartet’s name has a double meaning. The Ohio & Erie Canal came through Akron back in the day, and of course we barbershoppers love to lock and ring those chords!

I Only Have Eyes for You

This popular classic is now available in two versions. One has the shimmering feel of the rock ‘n’ roll hit, while the other is a contestable tempo ballad as sung by Metropolis. The latter can be sung either straight or, as the quartet did it, humorously.  Continue reading I Only Have Eyes for You

I Say a Little Prayer

When I first got involved with the Cleveland Heights High School Barbershoppers, I asked the young women what song they would most like to have arranged. Thinking of the Julia Roberts film “My Best Friend’s Wedding,” they choose this one. This sweet tune is now available to other youth groups, and there is also a version for the grown-ups which is pitched down a little.

I’ll Never Say “Never Again” Again

A lively swing number, this contestable tune was a hit for SAI medalist ReMix for the women and BHS medalist Metropolis for the men. We can’t really be sure about love, can we? Please specify whether you would like to preview the original ReMix version or Mo Field’s revision with intro by Jay Giallombardo—or both! Continue reading I’ll Never Say “Never Again” Again

Instrument of Peace

Patterned after the inspirational version sung by the Canadian Tenors, this song is purely beautiful. One might think of it as being similar to “Let There Be Peace on Earth” but with more specifics included. Such lyrics as “Where there is darkness, let me bring light” and “Where there Is hatred, let me bring love” show that one person can make a difference in this sometimes perilous world. Right now this chart is exclusive to the Scotianaires, but it will shake loose in a couple of years, so do keep a lookout for it—peacefully, of course. . . .

Let There Be Peace On Earth

A show closer with a great message, this song offers the best wish possible. The men’s version of this arrangement is published by the BHS, and it works great for women and mixed groups as well.  Continue reading Let There Be Peace On Earth

Mein Bruder macht im Tonfilm die Geräusche

Partly in English and partly in German, this song is, well . . . what it is, is . . . different—and great fun! The English title is “My Brother Makes the Sound Effects for Movies.” The sounds included are a mix of vocal, electronic and mechanical effects. And the piece is contestable too. It could be redone for your group to be all in one language or the other.

Michigan Rag

This energetic uptune was arranged, and partially composed, for Michigan Jake. It was sung in a cartoon by the one and only Michigan J. Frog, for whom that gold-medal quartet is named. If your lead(s) can handle a disjunct melody—and words that are, in the words of great bass man Bill Myers, printed very close to the page—then this lively number is for you!

My Brother Makes the Sound Effects for Movies

Partly in English and partly in German, this song is, well . . . what it is, is . . . different—and great fun! The sounds included are a mix of vocal, electronic and mechanical effects. And it is contestable too. It could be redone for your group to be all in one language or the other. The German title is “Mein Bruder macht im Tonfilm die Geräusche.”

New Old Songs Medley

This one is rather tough to describe. For one thing, it does not exist yet—at least not in a completed form. The gag is pairing the lyrics from songs by the Beatles, Rolling Stones and so on with the melodies of much older songs. Some examples of the latter are “Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland,” “After the Ball” and “I Got Rhythm.” The hope is to pleasantly scramble your audiences’ brain waves (maybe you own also). If you are interested in this weird concept, do give me a holler.

Nowhere to Go but Up

From the movie Mary Poppins Returns, this delightful song will take you on a natural high. You won’t be flying a kite—you will soar over the town, maybe even heading to the moon. This arrangement is fine for contests using the BHS judging system but might be more suitable for shows in the Sweet Adelines world. Commissioned by the Hunterdon Harmonizers, this piece is exclusive to them for a while longer.

Old Folks

The Four Renegades and Suntones used to sing Buzz Haeger’s version of this tune about a beloved old fellow. The song always reminds me of my grandfather William Thomas “Dandy” Gentry (1896-1987). Some people who have only an eighth-grade education are pretty darn smart. . . .

Pokarekare Ana

This gem of a Maori love song was originally arranged for The Ritz, who won quartet gold in 1991. They sang it with great success on a trip to New Zealand. The Musical Island Boys, our champ in 2014, picked up on it too, as have many other groups in that country. The lyrics are about half in English, but no worries, for Polynesian words are easy to sound out.

Second Star to the Right

A beautiful ballad from the animated film Peter Pan, this song was debuted at the 2009 Anaheim International contest by The Alliance. Tim Waurick has recorded fine learning tracks for both men and women. While this piece stands alone just fine, it would make a lovely companion to a Peter Pan or pirate medley in contest.  Continue reading Second Star to the Right