Inspirational & Religious

For Good (two soloists)

From the musical Wicked, this song features a heartfelt, intense dialogue between witches Elphaba and Glinda. If your group has two good soloists with medium to high voices, this is the ticket for you. This arrangement, and the sentiments of the song, work just fine for men as well. Tracks for the women’s version have been recorded by Shawn Thomas.

Instrument of Peace

Patterned after the inspirational version sung by the Canadian Tenors, this song is purely beautiful. One might think of it as being similar to “Let There Be Peace on Earth” but with more specifics included. Such lyrics as “Where there is darkness, let me bring light” and “Where there Is hatred, let me bring love” show that one person can make a difference in this sometimes perilous world. Right now this chart is exclusive to the Scotianaires, but it will shake loose in a couple of years, so do keep a lookout for it—peacefully, of course. . . .

Lost in the Stars

This is a contestable version of a most powerful song. Judges in the Performance category have assured me that this song does not really function a religious number, but rather as a lament about feeling quite alone. The arrangement is no longer exclusive to the Brothers in Harmony, who sang it most dramatically in International competition.

Nowhere to Go but Up

From the movie Mary Poppins Returns, this delightful song will take you on a natural high. You won’t be flying a kite—you will soar over the town, maybe even heading to the moon. This arrangement is fine for contests using the BHS judging system but might be more suitable for shows in the Sweet Adelines world. Commissioned by the Hunterdon Harmonizers, this piece is exclusive to them for a while longer.

Something Inside So Strong

Arranged to help the Dutch Association of Barbershop Singers (DABS) celebrate its 20th anniversary, this song is as strong as it gets. It has been used for protest and inspiration by a wide variety of oppressed groups, though anyone can relate to its powerful, uplifting message. A mixed version is now available.

We Rise Again

This song of resilience and hope was composed by Leon Dubinsky, a songwriter from Sydney, Nova Scotia, for a 1984 stage musical titled The Rise and Follies of Cape Breton. The Rankin Family’s 1993 rendition popularized the song across Canada. The message of this song is certainly fitting for the time we live in. So lift your audience’s hearts, and your own, with this soaring song.

You Walk with Me

This beautiful tempo ballad comes from the Broadway musical version of The Full Monty. At first hearing, I assumed it was a religious piece. While “You Walk with Me” certainly can be sung that way, in the musical it is sung by two people who love each other. Do yourself a favor and look this song up, whether through a preview from me or simply online.